Category Archives: Apple

Do you hate the new look of OS X Tiger’s Mail.app?

Apple’s Mail.app version 2.0 is a drastic change from the previous version. I’m not totally sold on the new look. Here are some free applications that will hack the resources of mail.app so that it looks different.

Cagefighter:

http://otierney.net/cagefighter/

Mail Fixer, looks like it’ll work with themes so users can create their own theme and share them with other users of the app.

http://www.buyicons.com/

if you come across other hacks for mail.app then post in the comments.

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iTunes control from ANYWHERE on your Mac.

SizzlingKeys

This app is so incredible! I can’t believe that it’s been out for year now and I’ve just discovered it.

You can completely controll iTunes by using quick key combinations. It lets you play, pause, rate songs and more, using hotkeys you define via an intuitive Preference Pane plug-in.

It also show a nice brief, unobtrusive window overlay that shows info about the current playing song when the song starts, including album cover art if the song has the art info in its tag. You can control how long this window displays also.

On top of all of these great features, the app is COMPLETELY FREE!

I have recently been trying to get QuickSilver, another must have app, to do the same thing this app does but haven’t had any luck. Given, I’m not a QuickSilver expert. This is even better… free, easy install, quick setup, great interface, full featured.

The developer also offers other free apps as well.

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OS X deployment document

OS X deployment documentation

This is what I’ve been using for deploying OS X to my clients. The document comes straight from one of our Apple reps. I’ve never seen it posted anywhere. It’s been working very well for us. It contains the following topics:

‘Creating an Apple Software Restore (ASR) Disk Image
‘Run Classic from a Locked/Read-Only Disk Image
‘How To Hide The ‘admin’, Or Any Other Account, from Displaying In the Login Window
‘Create an Account that Self Refreshes at Logout (AKA, The Self Cleaning Oven)

After following the steps in this doc for creating an ASR Disk Image we then use FileWave for sending changes and updates (software only) to the client. The only major change to what we do versus what this document describes is using Penn States "Blast Image Config" to copy the image to the hard drive instead of NetRestore or Disk Utility. Blast Image Config is very fast (faster than NetRestore) and provides a lot of extra features. It still could use some enhancements, of which I emailed the author and they have yet to added.

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Mac OS X Debugging Magic

Apple Link

This technote describes a number of ‘secret’ debugging facilities in Mac OS X, including environment variables, preferences, routines callable from GDB, special files, and so on. If you’re developing for Mac OS X, you should look through this list to see if you’re missing out on something that will make your life easier.

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audioscrobbler.com… check this out!

Perhaps another gimmicky site that won’t amount to much. Perhaps it’ll be helpful and turn me onto some new bands eventually. Here’s hoping. Check out www.audioscrobbler.com.

This is what the site says about itself:

"Audioscrobbler builds a profile of your musical taste using a plugin for your media player (Winamp, iTunes, etc..). Plugins send the name of every song you play to the Audioscrobbler server, which updates your musical profile with the new song. Every person with a plugin has their own page on this site which shows their listening statistics. The system automatically matches you to people with a similar music taste, and generates personalised recommendations.

There are lots of people using Audioscrobbler, but you probably won’t be interested in most of them. The Audioscrobbler Server calculates which people are most similar to you, based on shared musical taste, so you can take a look at what your peers are listening to.

With this information, Audioscrobbler is able to automatically generate suggestions for new songs/artists you might like. These suggestions are based on the same principles as Amazon’s "People who bought this also bought X,Y,Z", but because the Audioscrobbler data is what people are actually listening to, the suggestions tend to make more sense than Amazon."

It has a kind of cool "movers" list that tells what’s becoming more popular and what’s dropping off the list. Reminds me of the Lyco’s Top 50.

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