All posts by chris

Fews to release new album, Into Red, in March

London based Fews is set to release their sophomore album, Into Red, on March 1st, 2019. They’ve released a couple tracks such More Than Ever, linked below.

Their 2016 debut Means was released by label Play It Again Sam out of Brussels. Their style can be described as post-punk and Krautrock-inspired.

Recommended if you like: Interpol, DIIV

Fews on Bandcamp

Pre-order the album

Continue reading Fews to release new album, Into Red, in March

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The Twilight Sad to release new album ‘ It Won/t Be Like This All the Time’

Alternapop favs The Twilight Sad are releasing their new album, the band’s 5th full-length, It Won’t Be Like This All The Time, on January 19th. It was announced last fall and they’ve been slowly releasing tracks from the upcoming album.

This will be their first album on Mogwai’s Rock Action Records out of Glasgow.

Guitarist Andy MacFarlane stated, via an NME interview, “It all came together really well. To me, it’s like a different band almost. I did a stupid thing of writing loads of music, then giving it to James to write stuff over, then I deleted all the music. So then I wrote another album under it… I think we just needed to shake up the routine. One of our mates bought us those Brian Eno Oblique Strategy cards. I picked one out and it was like ‘delete everything, must try harder, don’t tell James’. The aim was to try and do stuff that we’d enjoy playing live, to make it more interesting for ourselves as well as everyone else.”

Singer James Graham says, “It’s all pretty full on but there’s some lighter shades and some hope on there. The first song that we’re going to come back with epitomizes the record. It’s got really noisy guitars but it’s pretty melodic. I think it’s the next stage of who we’re meant to be.”

The album is a welcome progression. It’s definitely a TSS album but they obviously experiment enough to keep it fresh. It’s a little more keyboard heavy than previous albums while maintaining a rock feel. Andy utilizes an E-Bow (electronic string driver) which moves the sound a bit away from the shoegaze sound of prior albums and the result, along with the overall production, is likely a somewhat more accessible sound.

The album’s strong computer generated, fractured artwork is “to represent fractured memories”, per Graham.

The have consistently been one of our more favorite bands to see live due to their genuine passion and appreciation for both music and their fans.

1. [10 Good Reasons for Modern Drugs]
2. Shooting Dennis Hopper Shooting
3. The Arbor
4. VTr
5. Sunday Day13
6. I/m Not Here [missing face]
7. Auge_Maschine
8. Keep It All to Myself
9. Girl Chewing Gum
10. Let/s Get Lost
11. Videograms

The new album is available for pre-order from:

Amazon
The Twilight Sad official store

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Blake Babies compilation available for pre-order

Around 1991 an old friend made a mixtape for me to introduce me to new music. This tape contained songs from bands from The Pixies to the Lemonheads, and many others.

It contained this tune called ‘Downtime’ from the Blake Babies which I became quite fond of. I still have this mixtape in my car that still has a cassette player and 6-disc changer. (Both hardly ever get used now that I installed a bluetooth adapter.)

The Blake Babies were a 3-piece with Juliana Hatfield, John Strohm, and Freda Love.

THE BLAKE BABIES "DOWNTIME"

This leads me to the announcement from American Laundromat Records that they are re-issuing the Blake Babies compilation, Innocence And Experience, on vinyl.

It’s up for pre-order now. There are several color choices and you can also get a test pressing. It’s been remastered by Sean Glonek.

Innocence and Experience
Pre-order Innocence and Experience

It contains other great Blake Babies tunes such as Lament, Cesspool, and Girl In A Box.

American Laundromat has also recently released Juliana’s latest solo album and an album covering Olivia Newton-John songs.

Be sure to read Jack Rabid’s interesting interview with the Black Babies at rockandrollglobe.com.

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Hum’s Matt Talbott to sell ‘Downward is Heavenward’ reissues next Sunday

1990s Champaign, Illinois Alternative Rock band Hum will be selling reissues of their Downward is Heavenward album on vinyl next Sunday, January 6th at 12 PM CST. (1 PM EST / 10 AM PST)

You can also order an exclusive Jay Ryan poster with the album.

Downward is Heavenward was released nearly 21 years ago on January 27, 1998 and made it to #6 on the US Indie charts.  In 1999, Pitchfork placed the album at #81 on their top 100 albums of the 1990s.

Get your browser’s autofill feature filled in and get ready to hit Refresh a couple hundred times.

https://earthanalogrecords.bigcartel.com/category/vinyl-record

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Favorite Albums from 2018

 

These are the albums that were released in 2018 that got the most play, listed in alphabetical order:

  Deeper – Deeper

Deeper is a post-punk band based in Chicago, Illinois.

  Film School – Bright To Death

Film School is a San Francisco/Los Angeles shoegaze revivalist band who released their 5th album.

  Holy – All These Worlds Are Yours

Holy is the Stockholm based project of Hannes Ferm from Umeå, Sweden.

  Jaguwar – Ringthing

Jaguwar formed in summer 2012 under the starsigns of shoegaze and noisepop music.

  The KVB – Only Now Forever

The KVB, from London, blends reverb soaked shoegaze with minimalist electronic production. This was their 5th release.

  Moaning – Moaning

Moaning is a Los Angeles-based post-punk outfit that combines melody with raucous noise.

  Ought – Room Inside The World

Ought, from Montreal, began in 2011, taking heavy cues from their city’s thriving scene of underground politics, loft parties, and D.I.Y. culture.

  Preoccupations – New Material

Preoccupations, from Calgary, play a fusion of art rock and lo-fi pop that maintains a very human pulse despite the extensive use of electronics and noise.

  Salad Boys – This Is Glue

Salad Boys are a New Zealand indie pop band. This is their second release.

  Shame – Songs Of Praise

Shame, from South London, released their debut this year.

  Soft Science – Maps

Soft Science is a dream pop / shoegaze band from Sacramento, California.

  Teenage Wrist – Chrome Neon Jesus

Teenage Wrist, from Los Angeles, released their debut full length showing influences from 90s British bands like Catherine Wheel and Swervedriver.

Please give them a listen if you’re not familiar with them and, as always, support the artists.

Want to be considered for 2019?

Please submit releases to the address here.

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Brooklyn’s Big Bliss Releases Debut Album

Big Bliss, a post-punk trio from Brooklyn, has released their debut full-length, At Middle Distance.

They released a 5-track EP, Keep Near, in 2016 which was available on cassette only. (Anyone have one available?)

Recommended if you like: Wolf Parade, Pixies, Modest Mouse, Interpol, Echo and the Bunnymen

It’s available on CD, black vinyl, and digitally on Bandcamp.

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Deerhunter to release ‘Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?’

How do you describe an album out of time, concerned with the disappearance of culture, of humanity, of nature, of logic and emotion? Why make this album in an era when attention spans have been reduced to next to nothing, and the tactile grains of making music have been further reduced to algorithms and projected playlist placement. Why wake up in the morning? Why hasn’t everything already disappeared?

Deerhunter’s eighth LP forgets the questions and makes up unrelated answers. It gets up, walks around, it records itself in several strategic geographic points across North America. It comes home, restructures itself and goes back to bed to avoid the bad news.

From the opening harpsichord and piano figures of ‘Death in Midsummer’, it is impossible to tell where the record came from. Is ‘No One’s Sleeping’ an outtake of an aborted Kinks recording session in 1977 Berlin with Eno producing? No. That is nostalgia. If there is one thing Deerhunter are making clear it is that they have exhausted themselves with that toxic concept.

What they spend their time doing instead is reinventing their approach to microphones, the drum kit, the harpsichord, the electromechanical and synthetic sounds of keyboards. Whatever guitars are left are pure chrome, plugged straight into the mixing desk with no amplifier or vintage warmth.

The result is as thrilling, haunting, and unpredictable as anything in their roughly 15-year career.

Deerhunter have made a science fiction album about the present. Is it needed right now? Is it relevant? Perhaps only to a small audience. DADA was a reaction to the horrors of war. Punk was a reaction to the slow and vacant 70’s. Hip Hop was a liberated musical culture that challenged the notions presented wholesale about the African-American experience. What is popular music today a reaction to?

4AD Label Site
Amazon

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The Beatles ‘White Album’ 50th Anniversary Editions

Giles Martin & Sam Okell discuss the upcoming Beatles ‘White Album’ 50th anniversary release.

On November 9, The Beatles will release a suite of lavishly presented ‘White Album’ packages including a super deluxe 7-disc set featuring 50 mostly previously unreleased recordings all newly mixed with 5.1 surround audio as well as the much-sought after Esher Demos.

The album will be available in super deluxe 7-disc, deluxe 4LP, deluxe 3CD and 2LP editions, all with the new stereo audio mixes.

You can pre-order them now here:

• 2LP edition
• 4LP deluxe (limited edition)
• 6 CD + Blu-ray
• 3 CD

 

The Beatles (White Album) Anniversary Releases – Giles Martin & Sam Okell

 

Much of the initial songwriting for ‘The White Album’ was done in Rishikesh, India between February and April 1968, when John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr joined a course at the Maharishi’s Academy of Transcendental Meditation. In a postcard to Ringo, who had returned to England before the others, John wrote, “we’ve got about two L.P.s worth of songs now so get your drums out.”

During the last week of May, The Beatles gathered at George’s house in Esher, Surrey, where they recorded acoustic demos for 27 songs. Known as the Esher Demos, all 27 recordings are included in the new edition’s Deluxe and Super Deluxe packages, sourced from the original four-track tapes. Twenty-one of the demoed songs were recorded during the subsequent studio sessions, and 19 were ultimately finished and included on ‘The White Album.’

The Beatles’ studio sessions for The BEATLES (‘White Album’) began on May 30, 1968 at Abbey Road Studios. In the 20 weeks that followed, The Beatles devoted most of their time to sessions there for the new album, with some recording also done at Trident Studios. The final session for the album took place at Abbey Road on October 16, a 24-hour marathon with producer George Martin to sequence the double album’s four sides and to complete edits and cross-fades between its songs. The Beatles’ approach to recording for ‘The White Album’ was quite different from what they had done for ‘Sgt. Pepper.’ Rather than layering individually overdubbed parts on a multi-track tape, many of the ‘White Album’ session takes were recorded to four-track and eight-track tape as group performances with a live lead vocal. The Beatles often recorded take after take for a song, as evidenced by the Super Deluxe set’s Take 102 for “Not Guilty,” a song that was not included on the album. This live-take recording style resulted in a less intricately structured, more unbridled album that would shift the course of rock music and cut a path for punk and indie rock.

  

 

The Beatles (White Album) – Tapebox

 

The Beatles’ newly adopted method of recording all through the night was time consuming and exhausting for their producer, George Martin. Martin had other duties, including his management of AIR (Associated Independent Recording), and he had also composed the orchestral score for The Beatles’ animated feature film, Yellow Submarine, released in July 1968. After the first three months of ‘White Album’ sessions, Martin took a three-week holiday from the studio, entrusting the control room to his young assistant Chris Thomas and balance engineer Ken Scott. Scott had taken the place of engineer Geoff Emerick, who left the sessions in mid-July. On August 22, Ringo Starr also left the sessions, returning 11 days later to find his drum kit adorned with flowers from his bandmates. While the sessions’ four and a half months of long hours and many takes did spark occasional friction in the studio, the session recordings reveal the closeness, camaraderie, and collaborative strengths within the band, as well as with George Martin.

The BEATLES (‘White Album’) was the first Beatles album to be released on the group’s own Apple Records label. Issued in both stereo and mono for the U.K. and in stereo for the U.S., the double album was an immediate bestseller, entering the British chart at number one and remaining there for eight of the 22 weeks it was listed. ‘The White Album’ also debuted at number one on the U.S. chart, holding the top spot for nine weeks of its initial 65-week chart run. In his glowing ‘White Album’ review for Rolling Stone, the magazine’s co-founder Jann Wenner declared: “It is the best album they have ever released, and only The Beatles are capable of making a better one.” In the U.S., ‘The White Album’ is 19-times platinum-certified by the RIAA and in 2000, it was inducted into the Recording Academy’s GRAMMY® Hall of Fame, recognizing “recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance.”

Super Deluxe [6CD+1Blu-ray set / digital audio collection]

CD 1: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix

  • Back in the U.S.S.R.
  • Dear Prudence
  • Glass Onion
  • Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  • Wild Honey Pie
  • The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • Happiness is a Warm Gun
  • Martha My Dear
  • I’m so tired
  • Blackbird
  • Piggies
  • Rocky Raccoon
  • Don’t Pass Me By
  • Why don’t we do it in the road?
  • I Will
  • Julia

CD 2: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix

  • Birthday
  • Yer Blues
  • Mother Nature’s Son
  • Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey
  • Sexy Sadie
  • Helter Skelter
  • Long, Long, Long
  • Revolution I
  • Honey Pie
  • Savoy Truffle
  • Cry Baby Cry
  • Revolution 9
  • Good Night

CD 3: Esher Demos

  • Back in the U.S.S.R.
  • Dear Prudence
  • Glass Onion
  • Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  • The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill
  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  • Happiness is a Warm Gun
  • I’m so tired
  • Blackbird
  • Piggies
  • Rocky Raccoon
  • Julia
  • Yer Blues
  • Mother Nature’s Son
  • Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey
  • Sexy Sadie
  • Revolution
  • Honey Pie
  • Cry Baby Cry
  • Sour Milk Sea
  • Junk
  • Child of Nature
  • Circles
  • Mean Mr. Mustard
  • Polythene Pam
  • Not Guilty
  • What’s the New Mary Jane

CD 4: Sessions

  • Revolution I (Take 18)
  • A Beginning (Take 4) / Don’t Pass Me By (Take 7)
  • Blackbird (Take 28)
  • Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey (Unnumbered rehearsal)
  • Good Night (Unnumbered rehearsal)
  • Good Night (Take 10 with a guitar part from Take 5)
  • Good Night (Take 22)
  • Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (Take 3)
  • Revolution (Unnumbered rehearsal)
  • Revolution (Take 14 – Instrumental backing track)
  • Cry Baby Cry (Unnumbered rehearsal)
  • Helter Skelter (First version – Take 2)

CD 5: Sessions

  • Sexy Sadie (Take 3)
  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Acoustic version – Take 2)
  • Hey Jude (Take 1)
  • St. Louis Blues (Studio jam)
  • Not Guilty (Take 102)
  • Mother Nature’s Son (Take 15)
  • Yer Blues (Take 5 with guide vocal)
  • What’s the New Mary Jane (Take 1)
  • Rocky Raccoon (Take 8)
  • Back in the U.S.S.R. (Take 5 – Instrumental backing track)
  • Dear Prudence (Vocal, guitar & drums)
  • Let It Be (Unnumbered rehearsal)
  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Third version – Take 27)
  • (You’re so Square) Baby, I Don’t Care (Studio jam)
  • Helter Skelter (Second version – Take 17)
  • Glass Onion (Take 10)

CD 6: Sessions

  • I Will (Take 13)
  • Blue Moon (Studio jam)
  • I Will (Take 29)
  • Step Inside Love (Studio jam)
  • Los Paranoias (Studio jam)
  • Can You Take Me Back? (Take 1)
  • Birthday (Take 2 – Instrumental backing track)
  • Piggies (Take 12 – Instrumental backing track)
  • Happiness is a Warm Gun (Take 19)
  • Honey Pie (Instrumental backing track)
  • Savoy Truffle (Instrumental backing track)
  • Martha My Dear (Without brass and strings)
  • Long, Long, Long (Take 44)
  • I’m so tired (Take 7)
  • I’m so tired (Take 14)
  • The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill (Take 2)
  • Why don’t we do it in the road? (Take 5)
  • Julia (Two rehearsals)
  • The Inner Light (Take 6 – Instrumental backing track)
  • Lady Madonna (Take 2 – Piano and drums)
  • Lady Madonna (Backing vocals from take 3)
  • Across the Universe (Take 6)

Blu-ray: The BEATLES (‘White Album’)

Audio Features:

: PCM Stereo (2018 Stereo Mix)
: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (2018)
: Dolby True HD 5.1 (2018)
: Mono (2018 Direct Transfer of ‘The White Album’ Original Mono Mix)

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The House of Love – Limited Edition 2LP Vinyl

The House Of Love were one of the most successful and critically acclaimed bands to grace Creation Records back in the late 1980s.

Their eponymous debut album, which was cited as one of the best albums of 1988 by music magazines and Indie fans alike, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year!

House of Love
House of Love

For the first time, the album is re-mastered from the original quarter-inch tapes, especially for this limited double vinyl edition in a gatefold sleeve.

Disc One replicates the original LP while Disc Two mops up all of the non-album tracks from various singles, from the original version of ‘Shine On’, ‘Real Animal’ and ‘Christine’ to their final single for the label, ‘Destroy The Heart’.

Pre-order here

THE HOUSE OF LOVE are touring to celebrate the 30th anniversary of their debut album, including a prestigious show at London’s Roundhouse:

09/11/18 – Leeds Becketts
10/11/18 – London Roundhouse

DISC ONE: THE ALBUM
SIDE ONE
1. CHRISTINE
2. HOPE
3. ROAD
4. SULPHUR
5. MAN TO CHILD

SIDE TWO
1. SALOME
2. LOVE IN A CAR
3. HAPPY
4. FISHERMAN’S TALE
5. TOUCH ME

DISC TWO: THE SINGLES
SIDE ONE
1. SHINE ON
2. LOVE
3. FLOW
4. REAL ANIMAL
5. PLASTIC
6. NOTHING TO ME
7. THE HILL

SIDE TWO
1. LONELINESS IS A GUN
2. THE HEDONIST
3. WELT
4. DESTROY THE HEART
5. BLIND
6. MR. JO

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Chicago’s Deeper releases post-punk debut

Deeper, hailing from Chicago, is singer/guitarist Nic Gohl, guitarist Mike Clawson, bassist Drew McBride, and drummer Shiraz Bhatti.

In 2014, Deeper was an established band with a handful of surf-pop-oriented demos when co-leader Caroline Campbell abruptly left the band. The remaining members regrouped and decided to carry on using the name, bringing in McBride and changing their direction to the guitar rock heard on their debut single, “Transmogrified.”

They’re releasing their self-titled post-punk debut on May 25th.

Order from Bandcamp

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Adorable’s Pete Fij comments on NME’s shutting down of its print edition

This was posted on Pete Fij’s (Pete Fijalkowski) facebook profile here.

Adorable – Glorious

“A lot of internet chatter about the demise of the NME magazine which is about to finish publishing it’s last print edition, so just thought I’d share some of the pivotal points in my early career involving the paper which kind of sums up the highs and lows of my career and relationship with the print press of the time.

It’s hard to emphasise now just how influential and important the NME was. It was Facebook and Twitter. It was the internet. There were maybe 3 or 4 roots to your audience – the NME, Melody Maker, Radio One (evening shows with Mark Goodier or John Peel) or maybe SNUB tv. That was it, but top of the pile, if you were to have just support from one of those, it would be the NME every day of the week – it led the way head and shoulders in terms of importance for all things indie/alternative

Adorable first got came to wider attention back in late summer of 1991 when a white label we had pressed up got picked up and got a rave write up in the NME from Simon Williams which led to us coming tantalizingly close to signing with Rough Trade.

A few months later in January 1992 we got invited by NME to be part of their ‘NME On For 92’ showcase gig at The Venue in New Cross, London which brought unsigned or very new bands to the attention as ‘ones to watch’ – it was I suppose what the BBC’s ‘Sound Of’ is these days, often these showcase nights would feature bands who would go on to be huge, so the public and industry alike would come to see the next big thing. There were 8 bands over the 2 nights – we played with Suede on our night, both of us unsigned at that point, PJ Harvey was headlining the following evening. We went on stage knowing this was a pivotal moment, our one big chance, and we played a blinder of a show. I recall coming off and saying to others, “if we don’t get signed after that, we never will”. The next morning our manager Ed Connelly was struggling to keep up with all the offers coming in, he kept ringing us back every couple of hours with updates (“Cherry Red have made an offer, and RCA have left a message, and Chrysalis want a meeting tomorrow”) – we had probably a dozen offers, including several major labels, but Creation Records was the one that mattered (though we flirted with the idea of signing to Blur’s Food Records as well).

Our debut single (take 2) ‘Sunshine Smile’ got Single of The Week in NME (again reviewed by Simon Williams who said it was one of the best things since The Railway Children….hmmm), and this coupled with topping the NME indie charts was for me a real feeling of arriving. I remember opening the paper in a small side street in London outside the venue we were playing and seeing we were #1 in the NME charts and thinking “YEEEESSS!” I’d bought the paper every week, and used to pour over reviews, interviews, and the charts, so achieving these two milestones with our first release was a massive achievement. What I wasn’t to know that the first week of my career would be the high point and it’d be down hill from then on. Probably just as well.

Wil and myself did the interviews, and our attempts to distance ourselves from the attitude-light shoegazing movement, and align ourselves more to our outspoken heroes such as Morrissey, Julian Cope & Ian McCulloch, pushed us too far in the eyes of the press the other way, and we were considered pretentious arty know it alls (although there was more than a grain of truth in that!), and seen as egotistical and arrogant. That we had managed to achieve this image in 2 interviews that ran in total for just over a page means we made quite an impression, but sadly for us the wrong one, and we never got interviewed again in either the Melody Maker or the NME for our entire career after our debut single.

To make matters worse, our 3rd single ‘Homeboy’ (which I think was our best release) didn’t even get reviewed in the NME, despite the fact that our first two singles were hanging around the top end of the indie charts. ‘Sistine Chapel Ceiling’ got another single of the week, but still no interview feature piece.

NME - "The Ego Has Landed" (Adorable)
NME – “The Ego Has Landed” (Adorable)

I knew we were in serious trouble when in a small written 1/8th page Q&A piece in the NME to coincide with the album, they substituted my written answer to a question with a quote from a previous interview taken out of context and deliberately chosen to paint me as an arrogant tosser. I was advised by my press officer not to complain but I was furious that something so clearly black and white as a written answer to a questionnaire could be ignored and so openly manipulated, and how a persona was being created for me by the press (there would be a slow drip of casually referencing our egotism in the reviews of other bands etc all the while) over which I had no right to reply apart from the wingey “woe is me” single ‘Kangaroo Court’ (“I know I’m losing my appeal / cause I was hung, drawn and quartered before my trial / and every single thing that’s not real / was put before the jury without the privilege of denial”).

NME 05.02.92
NME 05.02.92

Our debut album ‘Against Perfection’ came out in March 1993 and the review in the NME described it as “a flawed classic” which I rather liked , though the 6/10 score seemed to go against the largely positive write up. We were later told by the reviewer that he had given it a higher score, but the reviews editor who didn’t like us had marked his score down, and it was at that point I realised that the stakes were stacked too high against us and it would be a miracle to turn this ship around.

By the time our second album ‘Fake’ came out in the autumn of 1994, we were on the ropes. The NME review finished us off mercilessly, complaining the album was “drenching us with tawdry non-songs and dashed promises that are anodyne and limp-wristed” with a 5/10 score (that probably DID reflect the reviewer’s opinion this time). Battered and bruised we called it a day realising that without support of our label (who had been distant from us from the word go), or the most important player in the music business at the time we were pretty much sunk.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

So a genuine thanks NME, and an equally genuine no thanks.”

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The Catherine Wheel’s Happy Days to be re-released for Record Store Day

Happy Days, The Catherine Wheel’s 3rd album, is being re-released for Record Store Day on April 21st. (Can we get Adam & Eve, please? If anyone wants to sell me their copy then please message me.)

Limited, one-time pressing of 2000 copies.

Here is the official Record Store Day text on the re-release:

‘Happy Days is the third full-length album by English alternative rock band Catherine Wheel, released in 1995. Like its predecessor, Chrome, it was produced by Gil Norton, and the influences of heavy metal and hard rock are prevalent on this album; however, the band does retain some elements of the shoegazing style that dominated their previous albums, particularly on the songs “Heal” and “Eat My Dust You Insensitive Fuck”.’

1. God Inside My Head – 3:52
2. Waydown – 3:14
3. Little Muscle – 3:04
4. Heal – 6:13
5. Empty Head – 3:12
6. Receive – 3:35
7. My Exhibition – 2:27
8. Eat My Dust You Insensitive Fuck – 8:06
9. Shocking – 3:58
10. Love Tips Up – 3:55
11. Judy Staring at the Sun – 3:56
12. Hole – 3:49
13. Fizzy Love – 3:34
14. Glitter – 4:10
15. Kill My Soul – 5:10

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Moaning

Moaning is a band defined by its duality. The abrasive, post punk trio comprised of Sean Solomon, Pascal Stevenson, and Andrew MacKelvie, began nearly a decade after the three met in L.A.’s DIY music scene. Their impassioned debut album comes born out of the member’s experiences with love and distress, creating a sound uniquely dark and sincere. Although the band is just breaking out of their infancy, Moaning’s sleek and cavernous tone emphasizes the turmoil of the era they were born into. One where the endless possibility for art and creation is met with the fear and doubt of an uncertain future.

The three began regularly frequenting DIY institutions like The Smell and Pehrspace, eventually selling out dozens of their own shows at both venues with their first few bands. Solomon recalls, after a brief hiatus from playing together, Moaning’s conception came when he sent Stevenson and MacKelvie the first demo for “Don’t Go,” setting the tone for the impulsive songwriting that would follow. The three fleshed out Solomon’s primitive recordings, adding in MacKelvie’s heavy syncopated drumming, and Stevenson’s melodic driving bass and synth parts, capturing each member’s personality in their sparse and fuzzed out tracks. Like many of their previous collaborative projects, Moaning forces pain up against pleasure, using the complexity of personal heart break to inform the band’s conflicted sound. The band eventually landed on the apt moniker Moaning, admiring the ambiguity the name held, and hoping to reference both an intimate wail and an anguished scream.

After laying the groundwork for the new project, Moaning quickly began showing off their first songs to audiences around their local scene, and eventually booked their first few tours on their own. Months after the band’s running start, the three went into their home studio to record an early version of “The Same” and decided to shoot a music video for the track. The band was tipped off about a house that was being demolished nearby, so they assembled a group of friends and filmed them taking turns destroying the estate while Solomon, Stevenson, and MacKelvie tried their best to perform the song amongst the chaos. The video’s budget was limited to the sledgehammers, spray paint, and case of beer they provided for the friends who were invited to cause havoc, emphasizing Moaning’s desire to make as much impact with as few resources as possible. The track’s skidding percussion and toned back vocals gave merely a glimmer of the target Moaning aimed to hit with their sound, and would be revisited with further experimentation on a later recording.

Upon its release, the homemade video for “The Same” caught the attention of Alex Newport, a seasoned engineer and producer who had previously worked with At The Drive-In, Bloc Party, and the Melvins. Newport was first to approach the band, eagerly extending the offer to help record whatever they planned to work on next. The young band was flattered by the gesture and were won over by Newport’s sincere enthusiasm during their first visit to his home studio. The three began working on the tracks that would make up their self titled release, employing a lush, open ended production quality that had never been at the band’s disposal. Tracks like “Artificial” stand out among the recordings, where Moaning used the studio’s recourses to take their frantic live arrangement and give it the intensity merited by Solomon’s lyrics. Once recording concluded Moaning started shopping around the album, and eventually it made its way to the Sub Pop office, where buzz began amongst the label’s staff. Sub Pop’s representatives and Moaning finally crossed paths at SXSW, and one month after the band’s explosive set, the three were hastily offered a record deal.

As a whole, Moaning drifts from sentimental to catastrophic, hiding meek and introspective lyrics within powerful droning dance songs, giving sonic nods to some of the band’s musical heroes like New Order, Broadcast, and Slowdive. The band’s youthful attitude is met with the weight of topics like loss, routine, and mental health, reflecting the anxiety towards the status quo that much of their generation faces today. Where many young bands take years to find their footing as writers and performers, Moaning has built up a confidence in sound and vision from the ten years of playing basements, bars, and ballrooms together in their previous projects. Yet, even with their polished exterior, Moaning continues to make the sacrifice of deeply personal anecdotes and emotions to their audience for the benefit of their craft.

You can order the new Moaning release here.

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CCFX, new EP from Olympia, Washington Indie Rock Outfit

Olympia, Washington outfit CCFX has already garnered some nice media coverage from Pitchfork (7.5 rating) and NPR Music.

CCFX is a new group resulting from a merger between two Olympia pop music outfits; CC Dust and Trans FX. On their debut self-titled EP, artists Chris McDonnell, Mirče Popovic, Mary Jane Dunphe and David Jaques offer a record that is at once a showcase and an aberration of what is currently coming out of the Pacific Northwest.

The opening track, The One To Wait, sounds like an early version of The Cure doing their own take on Suzanne Vega’s Tom’s Diner.  Maybe it’s only the drum beat but still.

Recommended if you like: The Cure, The Chameleons UK

Listen to more and buy the album/download here. (bandcamp)

CCFX – The One To Wait (Official Music Video) [DFA Records]

 

Recorded and (re)mixed with local OG Captain Tripps, the EP’s sound partially recalls late 90’s/early 00’s indie pop as chiming, melodic guitar parts counter and complement Mary Jane’s brilliant voice. In the same vein of the past few decades’ most beloved and coveted hitmakers (both in the clubs as well as on the radio), the music feeds on a sense of nostalgia not necessarily specific to any one time or place – sun-kissed riffs seem to go on forever, supported by a steady breakbeat.

The timbre of the music is warm and just slightly fuzzed out, and the expressive quality of Mary Jane’s voice is pushed to the front. The b-side’s “Ode,” a late CC Dust piece, and “2Tru,” written by Popovic, were put together around the time of Trans FX’s The Clearing, whereas “The One to Wait” and “Venetian Screens” found Dunphe, Jaques and McDonnell picking up where they left off a year later, swept up in the productive frenzy leading to TFX’s latest effort, Gaslit.

CCFX, over the course of this palpable evolution, have struck that rare yet essential balance between heartfelt sincerity and calculated disillusionment, bearing the mark of a project which is as fearless as it is humble, out there living as big as it wants to be. These four tracks grant listeners access to suppressed and superseded feelings from youth, paired with a backwards glint of whatever strange luxury this epoch’s future might still hold. FFO St Etienne, Q Lazarus, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, dancing, celebrations, success stories, TFX, CCの, etc.

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New Zealand’s Salad Boys to release new album ‘This Is Glue’

Christchurch, New Zealand’s Salad Boys are back with “This Is Glue”, the follow up to their critically acclaimed 2015 debut album “Metalmania”. Recorded once again by bandleader/guitarist Joe Sampson at his home studio, This Is Glue’s twelve songs dig deeper, with sharper hooks embedded deep within a more mature musicality.

This Is Glue, released by Trouble In Mind Records, hones Sampson’s songwriting chops to a razor edge, with many of the album’s songs sounding utterly timeless. The riffs and melodies seem all too familiar, perhaps recalling greats that came before them (The Chills, R.E.M., The Bats), but Sampson has a voice all his own (though sonically it reminds me of Eels’ Mark Oliver Everett) and This Is Glue’s tunes tread upon a singular path of measured melancholy. The themes are darker, the lyrics more claustrophobic and yearning with Sampson confronting anxiety, mortality, and fear through the his abstract lyrical lens; a cracked world view, to be sure. Songs like “Exaltation”, “Dogged Out” and “Divided” convey a world-weariness of a man twice his age. That’s not to say that This Is Glue is all doom and gloom; album opener “Blown Up” kickstarts with motorik drumming that crescendos into a thrilling guitar riff that could crack mountains. “Psych Slasher” crashes forward frenetically awash in phaser before easing into a melodic denouement buoyed by a bubbling synthesizer before a tidal wave of guitar crashes down again. Existential angst has never felt so exhilarating.

This is Glue follows their debut, Metalmania, which was quite good. As previously mentioned vocally it reminds me of Eels at times and musically reminds me of Deerhunter, though Deerhunter-like grooves are’t the overall flavor of the album. Check out this Deerhunter-like jam here from their debut:

You can buy the new album via Bandcamp here.

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Holy to release new album, ‘All these worlds are yours’

Holy is a Stockholm based project of Hannes Ferm from Umeå, Sweden. The new album, All These Worlds Are Yours, is out January 26, 2018 via PNKSLM Recordings.

It reminds one of modern psychedelic influenced bands like Tame Impala, Foxygen, and Deerhunter.

Some songs can run a bit long but I think it’s a solid release all the way through. It’s easy to just leave on and get lost in the music, and then before you know it you’ve listened to the entire thing.

Order via Bandcamp

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Juliana Hatfield “Hey Babe” 25th Anniversary Vinyl Reissue Pre-Order

American Laundromat Records has announced the 25th anniversary reissue of Juliana Hatfield’s “Hey Babe”. It’s available for pre-order now.

 

“We cannot be more excited to reissue Juliana Hatfield’s debut album “Hey Babe” on vinyl to celebrate its 25th Anniversary. We took great care to have our friend and long-time collaborator, Sean Glonek at SRG Studios newly master from the original 1/4″ analog tapes. The artwork has been recreated from the original LP art but with a little twist thanks to the skill and creativity of award-winning designer, Aaron Tanner of Melodic Virtue. This exclusive limited-edition pressing, in a single-pocket gatefold jacket, was pressed by hand at Burlington Record Plant in Burlington, VT.”

Pressing Information:

  • Mystery Wild Card Color Vinyl (50 pressed) Label Exclusive (Sold Out) [They usually do two or three different variations though sometimes just 1 color]
  • Clear Vinyl (100 pressed) Label Exclusive
  • Translucent Green Vinyl (175 pressed) Label Exclusive
  • Virgin Black Vinyl (325 pressed)
  • Translucent “Amethyst” Purple Vinyl (350 pressed)

*Please know due to licensing restrictions, we are unable to include digital downloads.

All “Bundle” pre-orders will be signed by Juliana
Test Pressings will be signed & personalized by Juliana
All pre-orders ship in early March 2018, unless your order included “Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John.” In this case, everything will ship in early April.

“Hey Babe” was produced by Gary Smith (Pixies, Throwing Muses, Blake Babies), and was originally released on Mammoth Records back in 1992. The album featured a bevy of guest players, including Mike Watt, Evan Dando, John Wesley Harding, Clay Tarver, Chick Graning, and Todd Philips.

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Abbey Road Studios engineer Sean Magee talks about working on The Beatles vinyl releases

 

Mixonline has a great interview with Sean Magee, Abbey Road Studios engineer, about The Beatles recent vinyl releases.

It’s an interesting and informative read for those interested in vinyl. He explains the challenges involved that’s worth the read even if you’re not a fan of The Beatles. He explains how they used test pressing after test pressing and even different types of pressings, traditional lacquer versus Direct Metal Mastering (DMM), to get the best possible quality.

You can buy the highly recommended 2014 The Beatles mono box set and will have the best sounding copy money can buy and for a reasonable price.

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