CCFX, new EP from Olympia, Washington Indie Rock Outfit

Olympia, Washington outfit CCFX has already garnered some nice media coverage from Pitchfork (7.5 rating) and NPR Music.

CCFX is a new group resulting from a merger between two Olympia pop music outfits; CC Dust and Trans FX. On their debut self-titled EP, artists Chris McDonnell, Mirče Popovic, Mary Jane Dunphe and David Jaques offer a record that is at once a showcase and an aberration of what is currently coming out of the Pacific Northwest.

The opening track, The One To Wait, sounds like an early version of The Cure doing their own take on Suzanne Vega’s Tom’s Diner.  Maybe it’s only the drum beat but still.

Recommended if you like: The Cure, The Chameleons UK

Listen to more and buy the album/download here. (bandcamp)

 

Recorded and (re)mixed with local OG Captain Tripps, the EP’s sound partially recalls late 90’s/early 00’s indie pop as chiming, melodic guitar parts counter and complement Mary Jane’s brilliant voice. In the same vein of the past few decades’ most beloved and coveted hitmakers (both in the clubs as well as on the radio), the music feeds on a sense of nostalgia not necessarily specific to any one time or place – sun-kissed riffs seem to go on forever, supported by a steady breakbeat.

The timbre of the music is warm and just slightly fuzzed out, and the expressive quality of Mary Jane’s voice is pushed to the front. The b-side’s “Ode,” a late CC Dust piece, and “2Tru,” written by Popovic, were put together around the time of Trans FX’s The Clearing, whereas “The One to Wait” and “Venetian Screens” found Dunphe, Jaques and McDonnell picking up where they left off a year later, swept up in the productive frenzy leading to TFX’s latest effort, Gaslit.

CCFX, over the course of this palpable evolution, have struck that rare yet essential balance between heartfelt sincerity and calculated disillusionment, bearing the mark of a project which is as fearless as it is humble, out there living as big as it wants to be. These four tracks grant listeners access to suppressed and superseded feelings from youth, paired with a backwards glint of whatever strange luxury this epoch’s future might still hold. FFO St Etienne, Q Lazarus, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, dancing, celebrations, success stories, TFX, CCの, etc.

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Juliana Hatfield “Hey Babe” 25th Anniversary Vinyl Reissue Pre-Order

American Laundromat Records has announced the 25th anniversary reissue of Juliana Hatfield’s “Hey Babe”. It’s available for pre-order now.

 

“We cannot be more excited to reissue Juliana Hatfield’s debut album “Hey Babe” on vinyl to celebrate its 25th Anniversary. We took great care to have our friend and long-time collaborator, Sean Glonek at SRG Studios newly master from the original 1/4″ analog tapes. The artwork has been recreated from the original LP art but with a little twist thanks to the skill and creativity of award-winning designer, Aaron Tanner of Melodic Virtue. This exclusive limited-edition pressing, in a single-pocket gatefold jacket, was pressed by hand at Burlington Record Plant in Burlington, VT.”

Pressing Information:

  • Mystery Wild Card Color Vinyl (50 pressed) Label Exclusive (Sold Out) [They usually do two or three different variations though sometimes just 1 color]
  • Clear Vinyl (100 pressed) Label Exclusive
  • Translucent Green Vinyl (175 pressed) Label Exclusive
  • Virgin Black Vinyl (325 pressed)
  • Translucent “Amethyst” Purple Vinyl (350 pressed)

*Please know due to licensing restrictions, we are unable to include digital downloads.

All “Bundle” pre-orders will be signed by Juliana
Test Pressings will be signed & personalized by Juliana
All pre-orders ship in early March 2018, unless your order included “Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John.” In this case, everything will ship in early April.

“Hey Babe” was produced by Gary Smith (Pixies, Throwing Muses, Blake Babies), and was originally released on Mammoth Records back in 1992. The album featured a bevy of guest players, including Mike Watt, Evan Dando, John Wesley Harding, Clay Tarver, Chick Graning, and Todd Philips.

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Abbey Road Studios engineer Sean Magee talks about working on The Beatles vinyl releases

 

Mixonline has a great interview with Sean Magee, Abbey Road Studios engineer, about The Beatles recent vinyl releases.

It’s an interesting and informative read for those interested in vinyl. He explains the challenges involved that’s worth the read even if you’re not a fan of The Beatles. He explains how they used test pressing after test pressing and even different types of pressings, traditional lacquer versus Direct Metal Mastering (DMM), to get the best possible quality.

You can buy the highly recommended 2014 The Beatles mono box set and will have the best sounding copy money can buy and for a reasonable price.

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Fazerdaze

Fazerdaze is the shoegaze/dream pop project of Amelia Murray, of Wellington, New Zealand. She released her debut self-titled EP in October 2014, recording it entirely in her bedroom studio in Auckland. With the help of multi-instrumentalist, Jonathan Pearce, who mastered the release, she created a dream-pop sound, using electric guitars and effect pedals.

Morningside, the debut album, was released on May 5, 2017.

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The Beatles seminal Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band 50th Anniversary Edition, A Must Have?

It’s 2017 and it’s been 50 years since The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. They are releasing a newly remixed 50th-anniversary edition. Is it worth it?

Giles Martin, George Martin’s son, discusses it here with Bob Boilen on NPR, with excellent original mono, hastily produced original stereo, and now 50th-anniversary edition audio examples and explains what has changed.


One of the big differences is that the original tapes required “bouncing” multiple tracks down onto a single track in order to make room for the remaining tracks. This lowered the quality of the recordings. For this new edition, they are not doing that.

Additionally, NPR’s Terry Gross also interviewed Giles Martin as well. They discuss experimentation, both musically and with drugs.

Both interviews discuss the multi-piano E-chord used to create the ending for A Day In The Life.

Terry Gross interviews Beatles Ringo Starr And Paul McCartney the next day. They don’t discuss specifics of the new anniversary release but discuss various Beatles’ moments: first meeting other members, the meaning behind “Yesterday”, and a touching moment when Paul and John bonded.

Buy the new 50th-anniversary special edition on CD, 2-LP vinyl, mp3, or streaming here.

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My Bloody Valentine’s Kevin Shields discusses the new Loveless all-analog vinyl release and compromises

Pitchfork interviewed Kevin Shields and they discussed the soon to be released all-analog Loveless vinyl release, his hearing changes through the years, and the new My Bloody Valentine album they are working on (to be released in 2018).

Regarding the decision to press a single disc instead of a double LP:

I wanted it to actually be played the way it was originally conceived, which is basically an A and B side: Loveless is like a mirror image of itself on each side. It works as a continuous thing. That’s where I got a little nuts, but it was one of the things that I got right [initially]. The obvious thing to do in this day and age would be to cut it onto two vinyls. That’s something I will do someday, just for the pure sound quality. But from the perspective of listening to it, I didn’t want that to be the only version that people had access to, because it just breaks it up. There are compromises.

You can read the whole interview here.

Edit:

There is a new Rolling Stone interview posted 11/15/2017 that is worth a read.

began exploring sounds influenced more by the Smiths, the Cure and the guitar of the Byrds. To Shields’ ears, his playing on My Bloody Valentine’s earliest records represented a “perversion of a guitar sound,” meaning “it’s extremely clean, extremely small and just noise – in a way not trying to be impressive.”

“Shields’ big inspirations around this time were American bands: Dinosaur Jr., some Sonic Youth and, “particularly for me,” Public Enemy. “The sound on the first two Public Enemy records were very mid-rangey,” he says. “They weren’t hi-fi hip-hop records. It wasn’t music that was designed for an arena, and I loved up-frontness of that sound and the lack of attempting to pacify the listener with prettiness.”

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Pumarosa releases debut album The Witch

Pumarosa (London) singer  and guitarist Isabel Munoz-Newsome met drummer Nicholas Owen when the pair turned up for rehearsals for a new project at a rundown pub in Homerton. No one else turned up and they decided to form a punk duo instead, and began writing material and rehearsing. After they moved their outfit to a warehouse in Manor House, they met Henry Brown(bass), Neville James (guitar), and Tomoya Suzuki (sax/keys), and a full-fledged Pumarosa was born. In 2015 the band  released their debut single, “Priestess,” after signing to Chess Club Records. Despite being nearly eight minutes long, the track received generous radio play and swiftly raised the band’s profile. The following year they put out their second single, “Cecile,” and began work on their debut record with producer Dan Carey (Kate Tempest, Bat for Lashes, TOY). The Witch was released in June 2017

Recommended if you like: Siouxsie and the Banshees, Chvrches, London Grammar



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